Grace Ferrari
Parkinson Expert

Grace Ferrari

Grace Ferrari, is the Director of Education and Services at Parkinson Society Canada. She has a wealth of knowledge in the field of Parkinson, and has dedicated a good portion of her life to help those who live with Parkinson and their families.

Working with Parkinson Society Canada for the past several years has been a fulfilling and rewarding experience for Grace, and she hopes that she can help answer questions and be of assistance to those who chose AgeComfort.com as their Resource Centre.

Posts by Grace Ferrari

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RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME

Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) is very common for people with Parkinson’s (although it also affects people who don’t have Parkinson’s), and is seen in approximately 10 % of the population and many are not aware that they have it.

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Atypical Parkinsonisms

Parkinson-plus disorders, also known as Atypical Parkinsonisms, are a group of diseases linked to a lack of dopamine in the brain.

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Freezing and Falls

Normally, we don’t have to think about the act of walking; our brain incorporates this activity into the task we are trying to achieve. For example, if you were off to the corner mailbox to mail a card to a friend, your brain would go into autopilot: Your brain would calculate the distance and speed as well as help you avoid the dips and cracks in the sidewalk, and you would be back at home before you knew it. When you have Parkinson’s, the timing aspect of your walking may be affected so this sort of “normal activity” can become more difficult.

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Parkinson’s Blues: A Bad Day or Depression?

Temporary ups and downs are part of the human experience. It’s when a de-pressed/sad mood persists for several weeks, deepens, and eventually starts interfering with everyday living that professional help is required.

When Dr. James Parkinson described the “shaking palsy” in 1817, he talked about the masked face, resting tremor, slowing of voluntary movement and stooped posture that we all recognize as the common characteristics of Parkinson’s. But he also described his patients as unhappy, dejected, or melancholic so the recognition that depression can be a part of Parkinson’s is not new.

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Effective Communication in Parkinson’s

Many people with Parkinson’s have communication challenges as a result of both motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Communication challenges can also occur during ‘on/off’ periods of medication use, which affect the person’s ability to function and interact with others. This article provides a general overview of communication challenges in Parkinson’s and provide you with some tips.

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Parkinson’s and Sexuality

Sexual concerns rank among the most difficult communication issues for couples. Our perceptions of masculinity and femininity and what we expect from our intimate relationships are as unique as our personalities. Self-concept, body image and self-esteem all impact the quality of our sexual relations The physical challenges presented by Parkinson’s can also have specific effects on sexual participation and satisfaction.

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Parkinson-Plus Syndromes

Parkinsonism is defined as any of a group of neurological disorders similar to Parkinson’s disease, marked by muscular rigidity, tremor and impaired motor control. Although, classic (idiopathic) Parkinson’s is the most common form of Parkinsonism, a small minority of people may be diagnosed with one of the atypical variants called Parkinson-Plus Syndromes.

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Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease

Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease

When someone who is 21-50 years old receives a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD), it is referred to as Young Onset Parkinson’s disease (YOPD), or early onset Parkinson’s.

Although most symptoms of PD are universal, regardless of age, managing the disease can be particularly challenging given the unique needs of a younger person and the person’s family medically, psychologically and socially.

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Parkinson’s Disease – Non-Motor Symptoms

Parkinson’s Disease – Non-Motor Symptoms

While Parkinson’s Disease is characterized by slowness of movement, rigidity, tremor and postural instability, many people with Parkinson’s may experience other changes; sometimes even prior to their motor symptoms. These other changes, known as non-motor symptoms, can also negatively affect one’s quality of life and many patients may not realize that these other symptoms are linked to Parkinson’s disease.

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Parkinson’s Disease and Depression

Parkinson’s Disease and Depression

Depression is one of the common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease; with as many as 50 per cent of people with Parkinson’s experiencing the symptoms of clinical depression at some stage of the disease. Although living with Parkinson’s can certainly be challenging, and the diagnosis can be frightening at first, depression in people with Parkinson’s may be caused by the chemical and physical changes in the area of the brain that affect mood, as well as movement.

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